Roll #62: We are Farmers

Two weeks of sitting around the house is easier said than done---but it was was doctor's orders and I intended to be a good patient. Two weeks of sitting, laying, and watching any and all content my streaming services could throw at me. Two weeks of surgery site cleaning, Jello, and bathing with a sponge on a stick. Two weeks of no photography.


While the cleaning, Jello, and awkward bathing continued, as soon as I was given the green light to drive again, I went out to make pictures. Knowing I would be limited in the speed and nature of my movement, street photography was out of the question, so I went for landscapes.


By now you know I enjoy fall and everything that comes along with it---fruit picking, pumpkin patching, foliage changing, etc. In my endeavors to get my fill of fall, I often wind my way through picturesque farms with strategically positioned barns and frolicking equines. As I drive by these picture-worthy visions, I think to myself, "I should take a picture of this." but never do. So as I set out to take some landscapes, I also set out to right this injustice. I was going to take pictures of some horses and whatever else caught my eye while travelling through the extremely desirable Howard County---but first a digression.


The year was 2010, I was in college and the school year had just started. Welcome week was coming to a close and the school had a surprise concert for the students: The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus. Wouldn't have been my first choice but it was a free concert and I couldn't think of a better way to start the school year than by being smashed against a sea of potentially disease-wielding peers. Before the band played their first note, the crowd began to chant. They, like I, were only familiar with one of the band's songs and they wanted to hear it: Face Down. Knowing the crowd would dissipate after hearing their smash hit, TRJA (don't mind the acronym) ignored pleas from the crowd for an hour and a half before playing Face Down. By then the audience was disgruntled, cursing at band members, and many even went home.


But I'm not going to do that. I know you came here for the horses so here they are.

If you're still here, I do have a few other interesting captures from my venture into landscape photography which resulted in one misfire (blank negative) and one perfectly composed image where I neglected to set my focus (I still make mistakes). Of note is the following image which was taken as I drove my way into the heart of Howard County's farmland.

To my left the sun was setting, casting a soft light across a perfectly manicured field of corn. I wanted to capture this perfection but I was in a flat and I needed elevation to do the vision justice---so I settled on some weeds adjacent to the field.


As I continued my drive, I found myself at a members-only country club. From behind a sign that read "Rich People Only," I snapped a picture of a couple canoeing their way around a pond. Their coordination and strength leaves much to be desired, however I commend their effort.

With one exposure left, I made my way home with the intent to stop somewhere to finish off the roll. Mid-journey, a field of grazing cattle appeared with a beautiful pastel sky as a backdrop. I pulled over, took the picture, and continued home. An appropriate way to finish a roll in the country.

Camera: Fujica GW690

Film: Kodak Portra 400 (120)

When: August 2020

Where: Howard County, MD

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Washington, D.C., USA 

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©2019 by Taylor Mackay